DISHES-HOT WATER (3 Pieces, Foo Dog, Brass Handles)

A very unusual and very rare Hot Water Dish made up of 3 pieces. First, hot water would be poured into the bottom bowl, food placed on the dish and the top placed. Unlike other Hot Water Dishes without covers, this one would keep the food warm for a long time. This example is extraordinary as all 3 pieces are in perfect condition with its original pair of twisted brass wire handles. If any of the 3 pieces is missing its value is substantially reduced.

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DISHES-COVERED SAUCE

Frankly, we do not know the purpose of this covered dish or really what to call it. The bottom is thick and sturdy whereas the top is thinner. The bottom has an inset edge into which the top fits perfectly. Only the top has the rain cloud border and there is no outside decoration on the bottom sides. The bottom is glazed. The top has a flat blue knob. We date it to the late 19th Century.

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CUPS-TEA-HANDLELESS-FLUTED (No Handles, Rain Cloud Border)

Canton Cups and their accompanying Saucers make up a confusing world in defining the many variations/sizes to be found for each. Accordingly, they will be found in separate listings. We will try not to differentiate between coffee, chocolate and tea cups or straight sided cans but will separate out demitasse cups. The Chinese did not have handles on their cups but for export they added them.

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CUPS-DEMITASSE (Covered, 2 Handles)

This is a very unusual covered cup which we call a demitasse cup because of its small size. It has 2 fairly plain loop handles and a very unusual knob that we have never seen before. The knob has 3 holes in an arched loop. It is of late 19th century into the 20th century manufacture. The two pieces have straight line borders which indicate their late manufacture. The pieces are made of thin delicate porcelain and the decoration is poor. Besides the borders, the tea houses are elementary and the usual early Canton trees have morphed into what Schiffer calls: "...giant ferns". The cover with its strange knob is easy to pick up and it acts to keep the contents warm.

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CUPS-CUSTARD (Flared Rim, Straight Line Border)

These small, straight line border cups probably were used for many purposes: custard, sauces, soup, garnishes, condiments, berries. They are interesting as they have flat unglazed bottoms, flared rims and a complete Canton scene around their outsides. They are made of thin porcelain and the sides are translucent. The two pictured here are the only ones we have personally seen and we consider them very rare. Herbert Schiffer does picture one on page 86 of his 1975 book and calls it a "berry bowl".

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CONDIMENT SETS

Canton Condiment Sets are much sought after and hard to find with all 9 pieces in perfect condition. Even harder to find is a set in the tradional lacquer box. That is why the price range is a wide one. Pictured first is a full Canton pattern set nestled on a rattan mat. The second set is the Canton pattern but missing the rain cloud borders. It is in a black and gold lacquer box. Next is the square center sections from each of the sets, they both are about 3 3/4" square. After them are the fronts and backs of pieces showing the different decoration and the unglazed bottoms that all the pieces have. In the last picture the lacquer box is shown. Fairly regularly, individual pieces from sets are sold in the $75.-$100. range.

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CIDER JUGS-TALL (No Spout Cover)

We have divided the Cider Jugs or Flagons into three categories: the tall ones have two categories,1) the no spout cover ones that are discussed here, 2) the tall ones with spout covers and 3) the shorter squat jugs. These are all magnificient forms with exquisite detail and dark blue color. Note the elaborate twisted handles and their attachments, the very carefully done borders and the well done Foo Dogs. Note: the Foo Dogs always face the sampans on the tall jugs---on the squat jugs they face the mountains.

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CHAMBER POTS (Triangular Knob)

This is possibly a unique Chamber Pot with its very unusual triangular knob. Chamber Pots were generally used as a urinal at night for those who did not want to make the trek to the outhouse. There are 4 differences between this chamber pot and the mushroom knob chamber pot, other than the knobs: 1) this triangular knob pot is not as squat as the mushroom knob pot 2) the cover does not fit into an inset groove like the other does 3) it has bulging sides not tapered sides 4) it is of heavier construction (thickness) and weighs about a pound more than the mushroom

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CHAMBER POTS (Mushroom Knob)

This is a very rare mushroom knob Chamber Pot and very few are known. A second example's dimensions, weights and provenance are shown in parentheses. Chamber pots were generally used as a urinal at night for those who did not want to make the trek to the outhouse. The mushroom knob is decorated with a lotus like flower of 20 petals. The last picture shows the second example's knob with only 15 petals. There are 4 differences between this chamber pot and the triangular knob pot, other than the knobs: 1) this mushroom knob pot is squatter than the triangular knob pot 2) the cover fits into an inset groove 3) it does not have bulging side 4) it is of lighter construction (thickness) and weighs about a pound less than the triangular knob pot.

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CHAMBER POTS (Loop Knob,1 Handle, Short)

This is a low size (8" tall) and heavy? (almost ? lbs.) Canton form. It differs from the 2 other single handled chamber pots by having a loop knob, not mushrooom or triangular knobs. This chamber pot has a top that overhangs the bottom, it does not have an inset rim. It has a single tang on the handle like the chamber pot with the triangular knob. It has a bulging side like the triangular knob pot. The bottom is glazed. The simple loop handle and loop knob indicate a late 19th century age.

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